Lion's Mane is vegan don't worry

Lion's Mane

This mushroom is often confused for actual lion’s mane. Mud is vegan so don’t worry, it is not actually a lion’s mane :) It is a fungus that is found in North America, East Asia, and Europe. It was believed that mushrooms gave you longevity and spiritual wisdom which is true in a sense when looking at this one specifically. Hericium Erinaceus has a strong nootropic effect (nootropics are supplements that make you smarter). We put this mushroom in mud to benefit the tribe’s mind.

This mushroom is very different than any other mushroom or herb that is out there. Lion’s mane stimulates the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). This protein can stimulate new brain cells and strengthen existing ones. How this works is when your body creates BDNF, genes in your body are switched on that then grow new brain cells and pathways. High levels of BDNF are linked to making you age slower, improve your memory, and even learn faster.

Lion’s mane also stimulates the growth of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) in the brain. NGF is a protein that is responsible for promoting the growth, connection, and health of brain cells. Low NGF is linked to mood problems and age-related brain degenerative problems.

NGF also regenerates myelination of nerve cells. This means the axon of nerve cells are coated with a fatty substance called myelin. Myelin sheath help the brain conduct signals quicker and more efficiently. If these mylenin are damaged these signals are slowed down.

A study in Japan showed people 50-80 years old with mild cognitive impairment had better results on a cognitive test while taking Hericium Erinaceus. These individuals were given the test a few weeks after the study while not supplementing lion’s mane and their cognitive function declined back to baseline. This proves lion’s mane actively can improve brain function.

A study where individuals ate lion’s mane cookies (pauses to google the recipe) reported a better wellbeing and alleviation of their stress after eating the cookies. New emerging studies are showing a correlation between mental illness and brain inflammation. The anti inflammatory effects on the brain with lion’s mane is also showing alleviation of anxiety and depression due to its ability in reducing the production of inflammatory proteins.

Our furry friend is exactly that, a furry friend. While lion’s mane is getting recognized for its nootropic effects it is also a neuroprotective, meaning it aids in the health of the neurons in your brain. As you are reading this and I type this our brains are getting damaged. Not because of my several typos that you have probably noticed but it is just how our brains are. There is no way around it. Kind of like while you are sitting still you are burning calories. Same idea. So a neuroprotector in your morning ritual is important to combat the damage and increase your longevity of brain health.

This article was fueled by MUD\WTR and an extra scoop of our furry friend lion’s mane.

-G\M