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Nutrition facts

Serving size
1 Tbsp (6g)
Calories
20
Total fat
.5g
Sodium
10mg
Total carbohydrate
4g
Dietary fiber
1g
Total sugar
0g
Protein
<1g
Potassium
110mg
Iron
0.4mg
Mushroom blend

Chaga, reishi, lion’s mane, cordyceps mushrooms and mycelium cultured on Organic Oats

INGREDIENTS: Organic cacao, Organic Spice Blend (organic cinnamon, organic turmeric, organic ginger, organic cardamom, organic black pepper, organic nutmeg, organic cloves), Organic black tea powder, Himalayan pink salt

100% USDA Organic, non-gmo, gluten free, vegan, Whole30 & Kosher

Nutrition facts

Serving size
1 Tbsp (6g)
Calories
20
Total fat
0g
Sodium
5mg
Total carbohydrate
4g
Dietary fiber
1g
Total sugar
0g
Protein
0g
Iron
0.3mg
Mushroom blend

Turkey tail and Reishi mushrooms and mycelium cultured on Organic Oats and/or Organic Sorghum

INGREDIENTS: Organic Lucuma Fruit Powder, Organic Rooibos Tea Extract, Organic Spice Blend (Organic Turmeric , Organic Cinnamon, Organic Ginger, Organic Cardamom, Organic Black Pepper, Organic Nutmeg, Organic Cloves), Organic Valerian Root Extract, Passionflower Extract, Organic Ashwagandha Root Extract, Organic Chamomile Extract

Organic, kosher, non-GMO, gluten-free and vegan

Offer details

The Black Friday/Cyber Monday Sale is active Nov. 20, 2022 through Nov. 28, 2022 and requires an order minimum of $35 to receive 25% off. Code RITUAL25 is site-wide on orders over $35 and auto-applied in most cases. The code can also be entered at checkout.

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  How Gut Health Affects Mental Health
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How Gut Health Affects Mental Health

Mud’s health advisor, Dr. Mary Pardee, explains the connection and consequences of the mind-gut connection

Aric Sleeper

Right now, your gut and brain are having a silent conversation, and whether it’s going well or heading south in the worst way is almost entirely up to you. Eating healthy foods will only get you halfway to a balanced dialogue, however. If you want your brain and gut to get along on a regular basis, you’ll have to be nice to both of them. 

“I tried every diet. I tried every supplement, and I did the full naturopathic treatment,” says functional and naturopathic medical doctor Mary Pardee. “It wasn’t until I addressed the mental health piece that I saw my own GI issues really turn around.” 

The Mind-Gut Connection

The environment of tiny organisms living in the gut, or microbiota, and the brain communicate through a number of interactions called the gut-brain axis. The main road of this axis is the vagus nerve, which transmits information from inside the gut to the central nervous system. Chemical messengers from the gut like neuropeptides also talk to the brain. 

“Our gut microbiome produces neurochemicals and messenger molecules that are able to cross over the GI lining, go into the bloodstream and communicate with our brain,” explains Pardee. “They’ve been linked to increasing depression and decreasing depression, or increasing inflammation, depending on the neuropeptides.”

For the Gut

In a 2021 study conducted by Stanford School of Medicine, researchers found that a diet high in fermented foods like yogurt, kimchi, kefir, and kombucha increased the microbial diversity of participants, and decreased signs of inflammation. Inflammation can cause a negative feedback loop in the brain and gut that may lead to conditions like indigestion and depression. 

“If we can lower inflammation, we’re likely going to improve our mental health,” says Pardee.

Pardee also recommends a high-fiber diet of fruits and vegetables, as fiber is the fuel for all the diverse forms of bacteria in the gut. When the bacteria are fed and happy, the whole body benefits. And to keep the gut microbiome diverse, Pardee suggests mixing different types of fruits and veggies into your diet whenever possible. 

For the Mind

The bacteria in the gut listen to the brain through neurotransmitter receptors that allow them to perceive what the brain is thinking. Stressors from the outside world can lead to mixed messages being sent from the mind to the gut. This can increase inflammation and allow virulent bacteria to thrive in the microbiota. To reduce stress reactions, Pardee recommends meditation, breathwork and yoga.

Aric Sleeper is an independent journalist covering labor, drug reform, food and the arts.

Header image by Julien Tromeur via Unsplash

Read more: Following Her Gut

Read more: This is Your Brain on Gut Health (And Vice Versa)

Read more: What to Know About the Gut Microbiome

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